Pop Shop 2 – Etching and Woodcutting

Categories

Description

Learn about printmaking using Haring's imagery as a starting point.

Objective

Students will learn about printmaking on various technical levels;
How to turn negative into positive and vice versa.
How to create a mirror image
How to develop a vocabulary of varied lines and textures.
How to control a two-dimensional surface compositionally.
Students will develop a familiarization with the tools and materials introduced.
Students will understand why and how we print images and text.

Resources

Linoleum prints
Pencils
Small mirrors
Linoleum blocks (at least 5" x 5")
Linoleum block cutting tools
Holding trays for linoleum blocks (to be positioned on table to aid in the cutting process).

For Styrofoam Prints
Clean, flat Styrofoam trays with the rims cut off(at least 5" x 5")
Different sized points- pens, pencils, needles, scissors?

Materials

Linoleum prints
Pencils
Small mirrors
Linoleum blocks (at least 5" x 5")
Linoleum block cutting tools
Holding trays for linoleum blocks (to be positioned on table to aid in the cutting process).

For Styrofoam Prints
Clean, flat Styrofoam trays with the rims cut off(at least 5" x 5")
Different sized points- pens, pencils, needles, scissors?

Procedure

Note:
An instructor may use linoleum blocks and do woodcutting prints with their students, however, in some schools, the cutting tools designed for this practice are perceived as dangerous or inappropriate for school, or perhaps, may just be a little too advanced for the age group performing this project. In either case, you may use Styrofoam trays instead which one can draw or cut into easily and safely. This modifies the project for safety requirements, and broadens the age ability as well. I prefer the linoleum cut print because it involves a more advanced set of technical skills to be learned, creates a richer print, and allows for much more variation and scope in the outcome of the prints produced from it. Included are directions for both methods.

Show students various forms of prints and printmaking methods so they may see the wide range of possibilities. Have them pay close attention to the various lines and effects that are exclusive to this form of image making. Allow them to consider how their symbol will change when they transform the materials that depict it.

Give the students some scrap of printing material (linoleum or Styrofoam) to test out the physical properties. Challenge them to experiment and question the possibilities of the material and corresponding tools. With both the linoleum and the Styrofoam, there is no turning back. Once a mark is made, it is not forgiven. This should hint should be shared optimistically, taking into consideration the possibility for change and surprise. If using linoleum, stress the importance of safety, caution, and pace. With all forms of art, especially preparing plates for printmaking, it is vital to maintain complete focus and concentration.

Save these scraps for Pop Shop Lesson 3.

Pass out their prepared surface that they will be drawing their symbol on to. Do not forget that everything that is drawn or written from left to right will appear right to left; a mirror image. This, most likely, is not the desired effect, especially when there may be letters or numbers in a student's symbol. So they must proportionally redraw while enlarging their image on to the plate. The image should come as far as possible to the parameters of the linoleum or Styrofoam, while still maintaining the proportional dimensions. Once the symbol is drawn lightly, the artist may go back into the drawing with impression tools.

The class should be quiet and focused. Play some classical music and create an industriously mellow environment for the students to concentrate on their work.

The linoleum will take much longer to work with than the Styrofoam, so the length of this lesson may vary. Do not be alarmed if the students need more than one or two sessions to finish up their linoleum blocks. This is a very meditative process, and you must trust that they are physically learning the material. A good suggestion is to parallel their learning process with your own symbol print as well, especially if you've never tried this method.

When the linoleum block is finished, it should have clean lines with no loose material. The image should be clear. To increase the intensity of a block, one can create different depths of carved linoleum which will produce varied results during the printing process.
When the Styrofoam plate is finished, it will be sturdy with a deep impression of the image the artist has chosen to depict. There will be no loose material, and any raised parts, such as the rim will be stripped away, leaving a flat sheet with an impressed image on it. With Styrofoam, the artist may choose to cut out the image into the actual shape of their symbol. This could lead to interesting results, however, make sure they still have included some graphics in their symbol as well so it is not just a shape.

With both the linoleum block and the Styrofoam plate, symbols should be in reverse. Make sure you have concentrated on this issue from the start so there are no mistakes at the end of this lesson.

Extensions

Check out the Museum of Modern Art's wonderfully illustrated site on PRINTMAKING.

About The Keith Haring Foundation

The mission of the Keith Haring Foundation is to sustain, expand, and protect the legacy of Keith Haring, his art, and his ideals. The Foundation supports not-for-profit organizations that assist children, as well as organizations involved in education, research and care related to AIDS.
 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *