Hip Hop Dancers

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Description

New York City High school students explore movement and performance in this lesson, which explores urban vernacular dance.

Objective

Students will explore the work of Keith Haring.

Students will analyze how Haring's work relates to popular culture today.

Students will examine how dancing can be represented though drawing.

Students will recognize the different positions of the body while dancing.

Students will develop a dance sequence.

Resources

ART
A variety of selected works from Keith Haring representing break dancing. Choose examples representing an array of body positions by his dancers.

Haring's Flip Books

VOCABULARY
Juxtaposed
Freeze frame
Break dancing terms to explain some of the dancing in Haring's work: Spider move, bridge, electric boogie, King Tut pyramid, two person wave, vogueing.

Materials

18X24 White Paper
Pencils
Sharpie markers
Tempera Paints & painting supplies
Colored markers

Procedure

Procedure
STEP 1
Introduce the work of Keith Haring. Give students some time to examine the work before discussing it.

STEP 2
Ask the students to make observations about the work. Ask them to explain their observations. Ask them how this relates to their own experiences.

STEP 3
Examine body positions of Haring's dancers: Ask for volunteers to demonstrate the movement depicted in Haring's work. (If no one volunteers be willing to demonstrate to get the ball rolling) Talk about how Haring's work acts like a freeze frame, capturing one moment in a sequence of steps.

STEP 4
Ask students to give an example of a dancing freeze frame not represented by Haring.

STEP 5
Have students begin working by making a series of thumbnail sketches, in pencil, representing various dancing position. They will work on this for the remainder of this class.

STEP 6
Next class, demonstrate sequential movements using showing body positions through a series of freeze frames. Have a student do a quick dance move, and then show how that might look frame-by-frame.

STEP 7
Have students develop a dance sequence using their vocabulary of images they drew last class. Have students outline in sharpie, and use paint or markers to fill their pictures.

STEP 8
When students have finished have a recital in which they demonstrate (if possible) their dance sequence. Play 1980's Hip Hop music to encourage participation and add excitement to the recital.

ASSESSMENT

I will assess the students on their ability to depict a sequence of action. If students do not want to participate in the dancing routine in the end, I will understand if they are feeling self-conscious.

REINFORCEMENT
If students were having trouble drawing sequentially, I would encourage them to slowly act out their dance in front of a mirror.

ENRICHMENT

If children have finish and they are waiting if the recital to begin they can review books on Keith Haring, Hip Hop Culture, musicians, and graffiti art.

Extensions

As follow up lesson see the flipbook animation lesson.

The author of this lesson, Deidre Kenna, a Masters in Art Education student of the School of Visual Arts in NYC, is the 2003-2004 scholarship recipient of the Keith Haring Scholarship award. This project is a collaboration with The School of Visual Arts & a local NYC public high school.

To find out more about The Keith Haring Foundation Scholarship offered through the School of Visual Arts, please contact: Director, School of Visual Arts/Visual Arts Foundation, 15 Gramercy Park South, NYC 10003 or SVA's web site.

About Deirdre Kenna

Deidre Kenna, a Masters in Art Education student of the School of Visual Arts in NYC, is the 2003-2004 scholarship recipient of the Keith Haring Scholarship award. This project is a collaboration with The School of Visual Arts & a local NYC public high school.
 

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